Google is probably the first place where most people would start searching for woodworking plans, but often the top results can be a mix of articles and how-to pieces that just aren’t detailed enough. Sometimes they’ll link to the plans (like we try to here at Lifehacker), but other times, they’re just showing off a cool project. There are better, more precise ways of finding what you’re looking for.
I recently came across this beautiful wooden swing set, which was made in the shape of a boat. Cool, isn’t it? The very first look was enough for me to start loving it. Although I haven’t yet tried building one myself, I am definitely going to. Later I realized that you can also build a baby cradle with the same idea. After all, what can be more calming than the tender rocking of a boat? This swing set will surely help your child get more gentle sleep.
At home usually, your kids have not a proper place for keeping the stationary, and they really miss that place. Sometimes their stationary is found lying in the drawers and you really need a proper place to keep them. I have introduced a wooden box in which you can keep the pencils and colors inside. I am sharing some of the pictures with you, just have a look at them.

To build this cutting board, you don’t need any skill or great woodworking experience. Just learn the basics of handling wood and wood related items and you are good to go. I made mine in just an hour and now I found this online two more in different shapes. Make yours in different shapes and sizes to cut vegetables and fruits and make cutting easier than ever before.

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Whether you're new to woodworking or you've been doing it for years, Woodcraft's selection of woodworking projects is one the best places to find your next big project. Whether you're looking to make wooden furniture, pens, toys, jewelry boxes, or any other project in between, the avid woodworker is sure to find his or her next masterpiece here. Find hundreds of detailed woodworking plans with highly accurate illustrations, instructions, and dimensions. Be sure to check out our Make Something blog to learn expert insights and inspiration for your next woodworking project.


Nightstands are nearly almost as important as the headboard of a mattress when it comes to a bedroom. They are absolutely perfect for placing lamps and novels for that late night reading, an alarm clock to remind you when it should be time to start your day, and for that nice, coaxing mug of sleepy time tea when you decide it is time to start winding down.


A super simple iPad Dock/stand made out of a single block of wood features an angled groove which gets to support the tablet device and a cut in a hole to revise access to the home button of your iPad. It’s possible to drill an access channel in the stand through which you can run a charging cable, although this mini stripped back iPad stand may have very limited functions.
I can decorate my favorite areas and corners of my house by placing stylish wooden book shelves. These wooden items give stylish look to my interior furnishing. You can also make a wonderful variety of wooden bookshelves easily at home. It is actually very stress-free and interesting to make. You must know you should have a bit of woodwork skills to do this innovative and stimulating work. All you need are a few pieces of wooden boards, wood cutter, electric drill, hammer, screws, and plates. You can easily make these wooden book racks by joining equal size wooden pieces of square shapes. You can also do easily.
Begin by cutting off a 10-in. length of the board and setting it aside. Rip the remaining 38-in. board to 6 in. wide and cut five evenly spaced saw kerfs 5/8 in. deep along one face. Crosscut the slotted board into four 9-in. pieces and glue them into a block, being careful not to slop glue into the saw kerfs (you can clean them out with a knife before the glue dries). Saw a 15-degree angle on one end and screw the plywood piece under the angled end of the block.
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